Software:
Remote Desktop Manager (http://www.devolutions.net/products/remotedesktopmanager.aspx) Gestisce le connessioni RDP

Using Remote Desktop (Web) Client

Fire up your web browser and go to the domain name or IP address + port number + /tsweb

For example, if your domain name is superduper.com and you are running the webserver on port 81, then you would point your browser to:

If you are using port 80, then you can leave out the port number: If you are not running a webserver and are only using IIS for Remote Desktop Web connection, I would highly suggest that you change the default port number from 80 to something else.

Once you point your website to the proper location, you'll see this:

Then after a few seconds, you'll see this.  Click "Yes".

 

The screen will disappear and now you can login to the Remote Desktop Web Host. 

Type in the domain name or IP number of the server into the line "Server".  Even if you're not using port 80, don't put the port number after the IP address here.  Just the domain name or IP address.  Under "Size" Full Screen is fine.  Click "Connect".

 

You'll be prompted for a user name and password.  Enter them here and Click "OK".

 

Now you're logged into the Remote Desktop Web Host.  By default, there will be a toolbar at the top of the screen which you can use to minimize, maximize, or close the Remote Desktop Window.  I like working the Remote Desktop in full screen mode, but you can also run it as simply another window on your local computer.

 To Quit the session, click the "X" at the top of the screen or select "Disconnect" from the "Start" menu.  You can sever the connection at anytime and whatever you were working on in the remote computer will continue.  You are simply disconnected.

==============================================

Installing Remote Desktop Web Connection in Windows XP
Article ID: 284931
This article describes how to install the Remote Desktop Web Connection in Windows XP.
MORE INFORMATION
With the Remote Desktop Web Connection, you can start a remote desktop connection from your Web browser. To do so, point your browser to a server that is configured with Remote Desktop Web Connection, download an ActiveX control, and then connect to a Windows XP-based server with Remote Desktop. Client computers may also connect to a Microsoft Windows 2000-based server or to a server that is running Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition.
To turn on the Remote Desktop Web Connection, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.
3. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.
4. Click Internet Information Services, and then click Details.
5. Click World Wide Web Service, and then click Details.
6. Select the Remote Desktop Web Connection check box, and then click OK.
7. Click OK on the Internet Information Services screen.
8. Click Next on the Windows Components Wizard screen.
Note If you cannot connect to the remote computer after you follow these earlier steps, make sure that Remote Desktop is turned on. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Right-click the My Computer icon on the desktop, and then click Properties.
2. Click the Remote tab.
3. Make sure that the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer check box is selected, and then click OK.
4. Try to connect to the remote computer again.
The files should now be installed. To start the Remote Desktop Web Connection, type the following URL in a client computer's Internet browser, where servername is the name of your server:
http://servername/tsweb
Note When you upgrade Windows XP, the Remote Desktop Web Connection Control is not updated. To update it, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.
3. Click Details.
4. Select the World Wide Web Service check box, click Details, then click the Remote Desktop Connection check box.
5. Click OK.
The latest version appears.


Terminal Services Server Configuration

This guide shows how to setup Terminal Services on the server versions of Windows, namely NT 4.0 Server, Windows 2000 Server, and Windows 2000 Advanced Server.  Terminal Services is not part of the other Windows families.

Looking for a way to remote control your server without actually sitting in front of it?  If you have one of the Server editions of Windows then you're in luck.  You can use Terminal Services which works quite well and it's free!

Terminal Services runs in two modes: Remote Administration and Application Server Mode.  We're interested in the Remote Administration mode because it is what we want to do and because the Application Server mode requires additional licensing stuff that we don't want to deal with nor pay for.

Here is an overview of how Terminal Services works.  You have Terminal Services run on your Server and it sits there and waits for a remote computer to connect to it.  This will be referred to as "Terminal Services Server" or "TS Server".  How does a remote computer connect to Terminal Services?  There are two ways.

The first way is to install a Terminal Services client on each of the computers you will use to remotely administer the server.  This will be referred to as "Terminal Services Client" or "TS Client".  You will have to create client disks using a built-in program.  This method works well, but you have to install the Terminal Services Client software on each computer you use to administer the server.  This could be a problem if you want to have the freedom to remotely control your server from a variety of places such as school, the library, or from a friends computer.  I don't think you want to install the client in all of those places. However, this method is fairly secure because the only people who can administer your server also need the TS client.

The second way requires that you install a special module called the Terminal Services Advanced Client which can be downloaded from Microsoft.com.  This will be called the "Terminal Services Advanced Client" or "TSAC".  I have no idea what Microsoft decided to call it "Advanced Client" because there is really nothing advanced about it. This module allows you to log into Terminal Services via any computer that has a web browser and Active X.  Of course there are still passwords required, but you get the convenience of administering your server from any computer connected to the Internet.

These two methods of connecting to Terminal Services will be covered in different articles.  Which of the two methods you use to access Terminal Services is your choice.

Let's get started.

Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> Add/Remove Programs -> Add/Remove Windows Components.
Scroll down until you see the Terminal Services listing.

Check the box that is labeled "Terminal Services".  For remote administration, you DO NOT need to check the box labeled "Terminal Services Licensing".  Click on "Next"

This next window allows you to choose between "Remote Administration Mode" and "Application Server Mode".  We are interested in the Remote Administration Mode so that we can manage the server from across the Internet.  The Application Server Mode requires special licensing that means more $$$.  Click on "Next".

Windows will start configuring your selection.

Here is the prompt asking for the location of your Windows 2000 Advanced Server CD.  Just type in the proper path to the CD location.

Hint: If you have the disk space, you can copy the entire Windows 2000 Advanced Server CD onto your hard disk in a storage directory so that you don't have to go looking for the CD every time you install a new component.  On my server, I don't even have a CD-ROM drive, so having the entire CD on the hard disk is very handy!

Windows will now continue to install Terminal Services until you see this screen.  Click on "Finish".

You will now get a prompt to restart your computer.  Close all of your applications and save your files and click "Yes" to reboot.

Once your computer reboots, it's time to configure Terminal Services.

Here we go: Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> Administrative Tools

This is where the Terminal Services are controlled from.

Let's take a look at the Terminal Services Manager.  Double click on the "Terminal Services Manager" icon.

Here we can see who is connected to the Terminal Services and other monitoring information.  Nothing to really do here.  Just to keep tabs on who is remotely administering your server.

Next, we'll look at the Terminal Services Configuration.  Double click on the "Terminal Services Configuration" icon.

Click on "Server Settings".  Here you can change the settings of how Terminal Services runs.  Everything can be safely left at the default settings.

Now that Terminal Services is running on the server, we need to allow the client computers to connect to the server.  Remember that there are two ways connect the the server using Terminal Services.  The first is to install a small Terminal Services client program on each client computer.  The other way is to access the Terminal Services Server though the Terminal Services Advanced Client (TS Web Client).

Note: By default, Terminal Services Server and Client talk to each other over port 3389.  You can change this port number through a registry hack.  However, if you decide to change the port number, you must make the described changes on the server and client side (the changes are different for the server and client). 

 


Terminal Services Client Configuration

We'll cover the standard Terminal Services Client program here.

On your Terminal Services Server, there is an icon labeled "Terminal Services Client Creator" which creates disks that are used to install the Terminal Services Client program on the computer you plan to use to remote administer the server.  You must install this client program on each computer you plan on using to remote administer the server.

Double click on the "Terminal Services Client Creator" icon.  You will see the following screen.  You must choose which version of windows (16-bit or 32-bit) the client disks should support.  As a gross simplification, windows 3.1 is 16-bit while windows 95 and later are 32-bit.  The 16 bit version of the Terminal Services Client requires 4 disks while the 32 bit version of TS Client requires only 2 disks.

Choose which version of the client you require and follow the directions.  After you are done making the Terminal Services Client disks, you can now install the TS Client on any computer you will use to remotely administer your server.

Note 1: The client computer that you use to remote administer your server can be on the external WAN or the internal LAN.  If you are using a LAN computer to access Terminal Services on your server, then you do not need to do anything with your router.  However, if you are planning on accessing Terminal Services from a computer across the Internet, you will need to forward port 3389 to your server.  This is very important since Terminal Services listens on port 3389.

Note 2: By default, Terminal Services Server and Client talk to each other over port 3389.  You can change this port number through a registry hack.  However, if you decide to change the port number, you must make the described changes on the server and client side (the changes are different for the server and client).  Here is the how to do it:  How to Change Terminal Server's Port

Let's install the Terminal Services Client on a computer that you will use to remote administer your server.

On a different computer (not your server), insert the first TS Client floppy disk into your disk drive.

My Computer -> 3.5 Floppy Drive (A:) -> Double Click on "Setup.exe". 

Click on "Continue" at this screen:

Click on "I Agree" at the License agreement:

Here you can choose the directory that the Terminal Services Client will be installed into.  Once you choose, click on the icon to begin installation.

You are prompted to choose whether the Terminal Services will be installed for just the current user or for everybody who uses this workstation.  This is your choice.  If you work at a computer that many people have to log in separately, then it would be best to only install it on your account.  If you're the only one who uses the computer, then the choice doesn't really matter.

Disk 1 installing..

Now it asks for Disk 2

Disk 2 installing..

Terminal Services Client Setup was completed successfully.  Click "OK"

Now under your Start -> Programs, you'll have "Terminal Services Client"

Double Click on "Client Connection Manager".  This menu allows you to create new connections to Terminal Services Servers.

Click on the left most icon to configure a connection to the server.  You'll see this Wizard.  Click "Next".

Under "Connection name" type in a descriptive name such as "Server" or "Home Web Server".
Under "Server name or IP address", type in the IP address of the Terminal Services Server.  If you're on a LAN, you can use the local IP numbers such as "192.168.1.xxx".  However, if you are on the WAN or Internet, you must type in your WAN IP address since LAN IP numbers are not accessible from the WAN.

Since I'm so creative, I've named my server simply "Server" and my local LAN IP address for the server is 192.168.1.20.  Fill in your own information, I'm just giving an example.  Click on "Next".

Here you have the option for the TS Client to remember your password and log on automatically.  I strongly suggest that you do not enable this function.  Do you want people to log onto your server without your permission?  I don't think so.  Click "Next".

Here you choose the size of the screen that the client will run in.  Note that depending on how fast your DSL/Cable line is, the larger the screen, the slower the connection between your client and server.  You can experiment with these settings until you get them to your liking.  I personally like 800x600 in full screen mode.  Once you make your choices, click "Next".

Here you can choose to enable data compression or cache bitmaps.  No matter what your DSL/Cable connection speed is, both options are a good idea.

This next window allows you to automatically start a program when you use your Terminal Services connection.  I left my setup blank.  Click "Next"

Here you get to choose which icon and program group your client connection goes into.  Default is fine.  Click "Next".

This screen tells you you're done.  Click "Finish".

Now when you go back to your "Client Connection Manager", you'll see the icon for your connection.  All you have to do to connect to the Terminal Services Server is double click on the icon.  To make your life easier, you can make a shortcut to your connection and put it on your desktop.

If you ever want to change the settings of the connection you just configured, all you have to do is right click on the icon and select "Properties".

You'll see 3 tabs that allow you to control all the settings we just configured.

 


 

Let's go back to the "Terminal Services Client" program group and double click on the "Terminal Services Client" icon.  This is another way to connect to your Terminal Services Server.  This client browses your network and looks for Terminal Services Servers.  Depending on your setup, you may or may not be able to connect through this method.  The "Client Connection Manager" is the better way to go.

Once you connect to you server through Terminal Services, you have full control over the server.  However, the desktop you see is not exactly the one that is open on the server itself.  The Terminal Services logs in separately, so technically, it is a different session.  However, everything you do in the Terminal Services session will be executed on the server.

Once you are done working with terminal services, how do you get out?

Go to "Start -> Shut Down".  You'll see four options.
Log off  This shuts down all applications and terminates your Terminal Services session.
Shut down This physically shuts down the computer and does not give you a way to restart the computer.  Be careful.
Restart This physically restarts the computer and in the process breaks your Terminal Services connection.  However, you will be able to reconnect once the server reboots.
Disconnect This is like logging off, but leaves your applications and open so you can reconnect and pick up work where you left off.

For most purposes, "Log off" and "Disconnect" will be your best choices.  I personally like "Disconnect".


Terminal Services Advanced Client Configuration (Web Client)

Let's talk about accessing the Terminal Services using the Terminal Services Advanced Client (TSAC).  TSAC is designed to work with IIS, however, it will also work with Apache for Windows as well.  This might take more tweaking, but it can be done.

First you need to download the TSAC from Microsoft.com.  Get it here: Terminal Services Advanced Client.

This program only needs to be installed on your server, not on any of your client computers.  The client computers will connect to TSAC through a web browser an Active X controls.

Once you download the file, double click on the file "tswebsetup.exe" to begin setup.  Click "Yes" at this screen

Read the licensing agreement, click "Yes".

Here you are prompted where to install the sample web pages.  These really are not samples, but are actually necessary, so pick a sub directory under your main web page.  The default path works fine if you haven't changed your IIS settings.  Click "OK".

The files will now be installed and then you will asked if you want to read the release notes.  It's your choice.

TSAC has been successfully installed.

That's it?  How the heck to you connect to your Terminal Services server?  It took me a while to figure it out as well.  You have to access the Terminal Services by entering the IP number followed by "tsweb" which is the directory where the entrance point to Terminal Services lies.

In your web browser, type in "http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/tsweb" where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is your IP number.  From inside your LAN, this number can be of the 192.168.1.xxx variety.  From the WAN, this number is your WAN IP number of your DSL/Cable line.  Make sure you have port 3389 forwarded to your server.

You should use an updated version of Microsoft Internet Explorer to access Terminal Services.  Netscape might not work so well.  The first time you try to access the Terminal Services through your browser, you will be prompted to install Terminal Services Active X controls.  This must be done in order for you to connect to the TSAC.

This is what the web browser screen looks like.

In the box labeled "server", type in the IP number of your server.  Then click "Connect".  You will see this warning message about switching into full screen mode.  You can toggle terminal services session into full screen mode by the keystrokes of "ctrl-alt-pause" after you click "OK".

Now you log into the server as you normally would.

Once you are done working with terminal services, how do you get out?

Go to "Start -> Shut Down".  You'll see four options.
Log off  This shuts down all applications and terminates your Terminal Services session.
Shut down This physically shuts down the computer and does not give you a way to restart the computer.  Be careful.
Restart This physically restarts the computer and in the process breaks your Terminal Services connection.  However, you will be able to reconnect once the server reboots.
Disconnect This is like logging off, but leaves your applications and open so you can reconnect and pick up work where you left off.

Using Terminal Services Advanced Client, you can log into your server though Terminal Services from any computer connected to the Internet.

One concern that has been brought up is that the Terminal Services login webpage is accessible to anybody on the Internet.  Although, you still need passwords to log onto the server, having an open administration page can be anxiety provoking.  One way to get around this is to disable anonymous browsing in IIS for the "tsweb" directory and use the "Basic authentication" option.  Another way is to create a password encoded page. 


How to disable Remote Desktop by using Group Policy
Article ID: 306300
emote Desktop is a new feature in Windows XP Professional that allows you to connect to your computer remotely and work as though you are sitting at the console. This article describes how to disable Remote Desktop by using the computer's local group policy.
NOTE: Remote Desktop is not available in Windows XP Home Edition.
MORE INFORMATION
To use the computer's local group policy to disable Remote Desktop:
1. Click Start, click Run, type gpedit.msc, and then click OK.
2. In the Group Policy editor, click to expand Computer Configuration, click to expand Administrative Templates, click to expand Windows Components, and then click to expand Terminal Services.
3. Double-click the Allow users to connect remotely using Terminal Services policy.
4. Set the policy to Enabled, and then click OK.
You can also use the following procedure to disable Remote Desktop; however, if you use the preceding procedure, the following configuration is overridden:
1. Right-click My Computer and click Properties.
2. Click the Remote tab.
3. In the Remote Desktop section, click to clear Allow users to connect remotely to this computer, and then click OK.
NOTE: Remote Desktop is disabled by default on Windows XP Professional.


How to configure the Remote Desktop client to connect to a specific port when you use Windows XP
Article ID: 304304
This article describes how to change the port number that the Remote Desktop client connects to. You may have to do this if the remote computer has had the "listening" port for Terminal Services or Remote Desktop connections changed from the default port. The default port is 3389.
For additional information about changing the listening port for Remote Desktop, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
306759 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306759/) How to change the listening port for Remote Desktop
MORE INFORMATION
To change the port number that the Remote Desktop client connects to, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, click All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.
2. In the Computer box, type the computer name or the IP address of the computer that you want to connect to, followed by a colon (:) and the port number that you want to use.
For example, to connect to port 3390 on a computer that is named "MyXPPro," type the following information:
MyXPPro:3390
To connect to port 3391 on a computer with IP address 10.10.10.1, type the following information:
10.10.10.1:3391
3. Click Connect.


Changing the Port Number (for security and multiple hosts)

In this guide, I'll show you how to change the port number that Remote Desktop uses.  Why would you want to do this? 

1.  For security purposes.  The standard port of 3389 that Remote Desktop uses is very well known which makes it a potential target for hackers.

2.  To allow multiple computers to run Remote Desktop Hosts from behind a router.  Since only one computer can use a given port number at anytime, we can give each computer that runs Remote Desktop Hosts a different port number so each one can be used remotely.  Otherwise, with just the standard port number of 3389, you would be able to connect to only one computer.  We can give Computer 1 port 4000, Computer 2 port 4001, and forward the appropriate ports to the correct computers.  Now you can connect to many computers behind one router, not just one.

Before we start, we have to deal with a few things.  First, each computer on your computer that you plan on using as a Remote Desktop Host must have a STATIC local IP address, assuming that you're behind a router.

In this example, we'll pretend that we have 3 computers behind a router that are running Windows XP Pro with Remote Desktop Hosts.  We'll configure it so that each computer will run Remote Desktop Hosts on a different port number.

Computer 1
IP: 192.168.1.40
Port: 4000

Computer 2
IP: 192.168.1.41
Port: 4001

Computer 3
IP: 192.168.1.42
Port: 4002

We're gonna have to mess with the Registry of Windows, which means that you should first back it up and be really careful with the changes you make.  The Registry is a pain in the butt to work with so make sure you are extra vigilant with any changes you make.

On the computer used as the Remote Desktop Hosts, we'll begin.

Go to: Start --> Run

Type in "regedit".  Hit "OK".
 

Navigate down to:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\TerminalServer\WinStations\RDP-Tcp\PortNumber
 

Click on "PortNumber".  Then using the "Edit" menu, click "Modify", and select "Decimal".

 

Now type in the port number you want to use.  In this example, I'll pick "4000".  You have to be careful in picking port numbers so they don't interfere with other programs you maybe using.

 

Click "OK" and close the Registry Editor.  You will need to reboot the computer for the changes to take effect.

Next, we go into our router to forward the proper ports to the proper computer.  In our example, computer 1 is 192.168.1.40 and uses port 4000, computer 2 is 192.168.1.41 and used port 4001, and computer 3 is 192.168.1.42 and is on port 4002.  So our port forwarding page might look something like this.

 

So how do we connect to these Remote Desktop Servers now that they have different port numbers?

Start the Remote Desktop Client.  Basically it's the same thing as using the Client normally, except that you add a port number to the computer name.  In our example, the computer name is located at temphost.com and we're using port 4000, so our client looks like this:

 

Now if you wanted to connect to computer 2, just type in "temphost:4001", then for computer 3, you use "temphost:4002".  In this method, we address each computer by its unique port number.

Even if you are just using one computer behind a router with Remote Desktop, it is a good idea to change the port number just for security sake.
 


Installing Remote Desktop (Web) Host

This guide assumes that you have not installed IIS 5.1 yet. 

Start --> Settings --> Control Panel --> Add or Remove Programs --> Add/Remove Windows Components

 

Highlight "Internet Information Services (IIS)" and click "Details".

 


 

Highlight "World Wide Web Service" and click "Details".

 


 

Check the box labeled "Remote Desktop Web Connection".  The box for "World Wide Web Service" will automatically check itself because it is required to run the Remote Desktop Web Host.  Click "OK".

 

As you can see here, other required parts of IIS are automatically selected as well.

 

If you are just using Remote Desktop Web Connection, then you don't need to install the FTP or SMTP server.  However, it's probably a good idea to install the documentation so check that box as well.

Click "OK".  This will take you back to the "Window Components" page.  Click "Next".

 

You'll be asked to insert the Windows XP CD-ROM.  Dig up the CD, pop it in and click "OK"

 

You'll see more installation notices.

 

Installation is now done.  Click "Finish".

 

By default, Remote Desktop Web Connection uses port 80 for the Web interface.  If you are running websites from this connection and need port 80 open, that's fine.  However, if you are using IIS just for Remote Desktop Web Connection, it is a good idea to change the port number that IIS is listening to for security purposes. 

Here's how to do that:

Start --> Settings --> Control Panel --> Administrative Tools --> Internet Information Services.

 

Click down to "Default Web Site".  Right click on it and select "Properties".

 


 

At "TCP Port" change the value from 80 to something of your choosing.  I'll be adventurous here and pick port 81.  After you change the number, click "OK".

Make sure to open up the corresponding port on your router, in addition to port 3389 which is required by Remote Desktop (Standard and Web).

 

You'll see a message telling you that IIS needs to be restarted.  Click "Yes".

 

You'll see this message saying the IIS will restart in 30 seconds or so.  You can just click "End Now".

 

There you go.  Remote Desktop Web Connection Host is now setup.